The Friday Night Knitting Club (Friday Night Knitting Club, #1)

"Now that I learned about this foreshadowing thing, I'm going to use it in all my stories!" That was the title of a story about John Grisham on the satirical news website The Onion, and I kept thinking of it as I read this book. Everything about it just seemed so amatuerish - the symbolism, the knitting metaphor, the foreshadowing, the corny, heavy-handed life lessons from wise older women, etc.
And, as several people on this site pointed out, there were so many events in the book that were not "Now that I learned about this foreshadowing thing, I'm going to use it in all my stories!" That was the title of a story about John Grisham on the satirical news website The Onion, and I kept thinking of it as I read this book. Everything about it just seemed so amatuerish - the symbolism, the knitting metaphor, the foreshadowing, the corny, heavy-handed life lessons from wise older women, etc. And, as several people on this site pointed out, there were so many events in the book that were not remotely believable. For example, Georgia just happens to find a sensible, wise, levelheaded widow who is more than happy to help out at her shop for free, and is an expert knitter herself? Or, she goes 13 years without reading the letters from the man who broke her heart, yet she brings them with her to Scotland and reads them there, and then he just shows up out of the blue? Give me a break. Also, there were so many situations that the author could have made more interesting. Like the situation with Cat leaving her husband - it's great that she left him because he was a complete jerk, but it wasn't very interesting. If he'd had some kind of redeeming qualities, or there had been an interesting secret, or they had

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had a child together, or something, it would have at least made it interesting.I also agree that Lucie's decision was irresponsible and the book kind of sugar-coated that. She decided to use some guy to impregnate her, when she wasn't even financially stable herself, and then not tell anyone about the pregnancy. I hate to sound judgmental, but the author did romanticize the whole idea.I am reading this book now and debating whether or not to finish it - it's pretty obvious how it's going to end. I hate to not finish a book, but this one just keeps getting lamer and lamer the more I read. And it makes me angry that the main character is going to die - not because that couldn't happen, but because I don't feel this book is good enough to get away with a depressing ending. The writing is medicore at best, and the book strains credibility to the max. But it's OK as a mindless escape to read after a day of working at an emotionally draining job. But if I'm going to read a mindless book, I want a mindless happy ending too. Well I'm not sure if I'll finish the book, but I know for sure I won't be wasting my time and money on the sequel, "Knit Two." This one was mediocre, but the sequel has the potential to be truly godawful. And, of course, so does the inevitable movie version of this book.Update: I did finish it, and it only got worse. A particularly groan-out-loud awful part was when Georgia just happened to run into a priest she knew, and they had a heart-to-heart chat in which he imparted another of the book's valuable life lesson. Except that his advice was basically just the Cliff Notes version on the (far superior) book "When Bad Things Happen to Good People." ...more


Category: Review

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